After evaluating a first functional prototype, the SeaClear gripper goes into manufacturing to produce a rugged, waterproof version for our trials. This device is designed and implemented by our partners at TUM. This version is decidedly simple for robust operation under harsh conditions and will provide a baseline for comparing its efficiency to upgrades with suction capabilities and other advanced features.
Render of the tortuga ROV with the gripper
Render of the tortuga ROV with the gripper. The gripper in the fully open and closed position is visible

Tags: equipment

Read more: Gripper prototype goes into manufacturing

As the SeaClear project progresses, Fraunhofer CML has been busy with the design and development of the collection basket for the autonomous system. The basket is designated to aggregate collected litter and ensure a safe transport out of the water and later on to shore, at the end of each mission. A modular prototype was built that allows for experiments with different wall materials, ROV-to-Basket docking areas, and Gripper-to-Basket interfaces.

Lateral view of the basket prototype
Prototype basket configuration with mesh-structure walls and elastomer lip interface

Tags: video, underwater, equipment

Read more: Collection Basket Prototype is ready

The youtube channel Breaking Lab has recently featured the SeaClear project in one of their episodes. Breaking lab is a channel that tries to explain complex scientific concepts to the general public. Jacob Beautemps and his team compiled a video that outlines the problem of plastics in the Ocean, the difficulty of cleaning it up with divers, and what are the advantages of using robotic solutions, before presenting the SeaClear concept.
Below you can watch the episode (in German)

The goal of the SeaClear project is to develop autonomous underwater and surface vessels for mapping, classification and collection of marine waste. Hopefully in the future, robots will be cleaning our oceans continuously, but for now, periodic ocean clean-up actions performed by divers and manned vessels remain the only option. However, to test the efficiency of the autonomous vessels being developed through the project, a baseline must be used for comparison, making monitoring the efficiency of current ocean clean-up actions essential to the project.

Tags: test sites, cleanup, video

Read more: ECO Cleanup action in Dubrovnik

This project has received funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No. 871295.

The SEACLEAR project spans four years, running from January 1st, 2020 to December 31st, 2023.

SEACLEAR is not responsible for the content of third-party sites to which we link from this site.

Design & maintenance by Lichtbringer